• ABIANDAABIANDA

Place Category: Communities, Education & Training, and Employment

Profile
Profile
More Info
Photos
Map
Related Listing
Social Impact Declaration
Social Impact Statements
  • Abianda is a social enterprise that works with gang-affected young women and the professionals that support them. Gang-affected young women are a hidden group in our communities, experience sexual violence and exploitation and can’t always access services for help. We aim to bring about a culture change in the way services are delivered to gang affected young women in order that:

    • They are no longer a hidden group in our communities;
    • Services can respond in partnership to their complex needs;
    • Young women and their children can be safe, and;
    • They can make the changes they want in their lives and contribute positively to their communities.

    We work to the assumption that GAYW are the experts on their lives and that those people affected by a problem are best placed to find solutions to it.

  • Address: Office 1, Andover Community Centre, 55 Corker Way
    London
    Greater London
    N7 7RY
    United Kingdom
  • No Records Found

    Sorry, no records were found. Please adjust your search criteria and try again.

    Google Map Not Loaded

    Sorry, unable to load Google Maps API.

  • Social Impact Declaration: Social-Impact-Declaration_Abianda.pdf
  • Social Impact Statements:

    Social Impact Statements

    The Social Enterprise Mark criteria includes a requirement that the applicant can demonstrate that social and/or environmental objectives are being achieved.

    In support of this, new applicants and renewing Mark holders must submit Social Impact Statements that summarise their headline activities and achievements, helping show how they are striving to make a difference and stand up to scrutiny of purpose as a social enterprise.

     


    1) Abianda is a social enterprise that works with gang-affected young women (GAYW) and the professionals that support them

    We aim to bring about a culture change in the way services are delivered to GAYW in order that:

    • GAYW are no longer a hidden group in our communities;
    • Services can respond in partnership to GAYW's complex needs;
    • GAYW and their children can be safe, and;
    • GAYW can make the changes they want in their lives and contribute positively to their
      communities

    We work to the assumption that GAYW are the experts on their lives and those people affected by a problem are best placed to find solutions to it.

    For young women we deliver:

    1. The Star Project: a one-to-one service for high risk GAYW aged 16-24
    2. Train-the-trainer: training for GAYW to become professional trainers in order that they co-deliver our training packages to professionals on a paid basis
    3. Bespoke participation projects: national projects to understand problems, and the solutions to them, from young people's perspective
    4. Young Women's Business Advisory Group: where young women develop business and leadership kills and influence strategic planning and the development of Abianda.

    For professionals, we offer:

    1. A range of training packages: including, working effectively with GAYW; Child Sexual Exploitation, Solution Focused Therapy; and Participatory Practice with marginlaised young people
    2. CARE: consultancy, analysis, review and evaluation services for local authorities, institutions and organisations

    All of our work has a direct social impact, whether working with young women or the professionals that support them. IN the last operational year we have:

    • Worked with young women not in employment, education or training (NEET) to understand the barriers they face in accessing employment and training. We supported them to influence the opportunities available to young omen in their local authority
    • Worked with our Young Trainers to develop monthly seminars on how to work effectively with gang-affected young women. They are delivering these seminars to London professionals
    • Trained professionals from a range of of professional contexts in order that they are more confident and equipped to support young women affected by gangs and children who are sexually exploited
    • Began a European project that will increase the knowledge and skills of specialist sexual violence (SV) services to use participatory practice with marginalised young people afected by SV

     


    2) In 2015/16, our key outputs were:

    • 7 x Young Trainers, who are gang-affected (GAYW), have delivered Abianda training packages to professionals on a paid basis
    • We have delivered a intensive 3-day training programme to 60 professionals on working effectively with GAYW
    • We have delivered child sexual exploitation training to 100 professionals
    • Developed new partnerships with statutory and non-statutory partners in Islington to support and risk manage our one-to-one work with GAYW
    • Consulted with 44 young women aged 16-24 about the barriers and challenges that young women face in accessing employment and training
    • Ran a young women's event for 11 young women who were not in employment and training
    • Worked for 1 year with 7 young women who were not in employment, education or training (NEET) through 18 group work sessions addressing barriers to employment and training

     


    3) Changing lives

    GAYW tell us that working with Abianda has changed their lives and they can safely talk to us about risks they feel they cannot discuss with other services. We have independently evaluated our services in order to formally gather this information from our service users. The evaluation stated that Abianda is innovative in:

    • Developing an unique model of practice that is clearly articulated & implemented in practice;
    • Using approaches & techniques that establish trusting relationships quickly & engage successfully with young women, hitherto with a history of non-engagement;
    • Working closely with other agencies, specifically with regard to risk management & safeguarding in an area where there are specific safeguarding challenges;
    • Meeting MOPAC’s core principles & minimum standards that to date, have been established as important in working with this group

    We collect beginning and end data on all our projects which details the impact and the need from the perspectives of our service users.

    Outcomes for young women include:

    • Increased knowledge:
      • of the risks they face in the context of gangs
      • of healthy and un-healthy relationships;
      • of sexual violence, CSE and other VAWG issues;
      • identifying the skills and strategies they are already using to navigate these risks and how they might be able to deploy these skills and strategies in the future to keep them (and their children where applicable) safe
    • We support young women to make the changes they want to make in their lives and to contribute positively to their communities
    • We support GAYW to:
      • manage big and difficult emotions (including anger, anxiety etc) that can lead to, or be a symptom of self harm and other mental health issue;
      • bounce-back despite adversity;
      • think critically about interconnectedness of the individual and social context as well as gender and identity;
      • navigate the risk they experience due to gang association;
      • keep themselves and their children safe and have control over their own lives

    As well as the SFBT techniques which are laced through our approach, we have a range participatory exercises that help us do this.

    100% of professionals trained have:

    • Increased abilty to identify GAYW
    • Increased knowledge of how young women are affected by gangs
    • Increased confidence to work effectively with GAYW